High School - Great Books Program

Evaluation

 
Readings/Poetry Required for Grade
Seminar Participation 30%
Study Guides 30%
Essays 10%
Oral Exams 30%
Total % 100%


GRADING SCALE

We utilize the following conventional grading scales, at the option of the
student or school at which we offer the Great Books Progam: the letter grade (A
to F); the 4.0 scale; the 100 point scale; the pass/fail option.

LETTER GRADE

4.0 SCALE

100 PT. SCALE

PASS/FAIL

A+

4.0

100

Pass

A (Excellent)

4.0

95

Pass

A-

3.67

90

Pass

B+

3.33

89

Pass

B

3.0

85

Pass

B-

2.67

80

Pass

C+

2.33

79

Pass

C

2.0

75

Pass

C-

1.67

70

Pass

D+

1.33

69

Pass (no college credit recommendation)

D

1

65

Pass (no college credit recommendation)

D-

.67

60

Pass (no college credit recommendation)

F (Failing)

0

0-59

Fail

F - If a student receives an F (failing) for a semester grade, that student must either repeat that semester (with repeat tuition) or drop out of the program. They may not proceed on to the next level as the program is sequential and each level is directly built upon the foundation formed at the prior level.

D – While the Program allows students to proceed to the next course level with any grade above an F (i.e. D- or better), the American Council on Education does not recommend college credit for any course (semester) completed with less than a C (whether it be a C-, C or C+) grade. If a student elects to repeat a course there is repeat tuition cost.

INDEPENDENT STUDY – some students may not be interested in the college credit requirements nor be able to attend the weekly discussion groups. Such students may enroll in the program, do the readings, study guides and essays only, and receive high school level credit for the courses. However no college credit would be recommended in this mode of study.

Your moderators will grade you through a mix of continuous assessment (a combination of seminar participation and written work throughout the semester) and oral examination at the conclusion of the semester. See the Discussions page to learn about the moderators are looking for.

As Einstein well said, “Not everything that counts can be counted, and not everything that can be counted counts.” Learning in the humanities does not lend itself to numerical quantification; nevertheless, students often want to have some idea of what is expected of them and how it is determined, at least in outline, so we have prepared this for that purpose and for use by colleges or universities into which our students may transfer.

 

 

 

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